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Aboriginal

The responsibility to consult with First Nations is an important part of doing business in BC. The Council is committed to working with businesses, governments and First Nations to bring greater clarity to the consultation processes on the land base, improve the capacity and understanding of partners to reach productive agreements and to enhance the shared economic opportunities for Aboriginal and non Aboriginal communities with BC businesses.

An innovative ‘meeting place’ between the BC business community and First Nations leadership launches to support economic reconciliation in BC

The Champions Table, an initiative resulting from the commitments made between the B.C Assembly of First Nations (BCAFN) and the Business Council of British Columbia (BCBC) in their Memorandum of Understanding signed on September 6, 2016, held their inaugural meeting on March 8th, 2017. The Champions Table establishes a formal ongoing dialogue where leaders can come together to explore opportunities, discuss barriers and work jointly to develop and advance a more effective approach to economic development based on reconciliation with First Nations.

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BC2035

BC2035 is about creating a shared vision of BC’s future and laying down a pathway to realize that vision. It is about initiating conversations, fostering greater collaboration and getting politicians, policy makers, First Nations leaders, and business leaders to think about, prepare for and act on the future.

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RELEASE: Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and Enbridge Line 3 replacement approval

The Business Council of British Columbia supports the federal government’s decision to approve the Trans Mountain Expansion Project and the Enbridge Line 3 Replacement Project as announcement by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau this afternoon.

“This decision recognizes that the Trans Mountain project and Enbridge Line 3 replacement are in the national interest and that there is a place for Canadian oil in global markets, even as the world shifts toward renewable and lower carbon energy forms and cleaner technology,” said Greg D’Avignon, President and CEO, Business Council of British Columbia.  “Global demand for energy continues to grow and fossil fuels will be a major source of energy for decades to come. Canada’s responsibly sourced and well-regulated energy resources can play an important role in fulfilling this global demand.”

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PRESENTATION: Aboriginal Economic Development & Prosperity Forum

Our Economic Prospects in a Slow-Growth World as presented by Jock Finlayson and Ken Peacock at the Aboriginal Economic Development and Prosperity Forum. 

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Business Council of BC and the BC Assembly of First Nations sign historic Memorandum of Understanding

British Columbia’s business and First Nations leadership have signed a landmark agreement to ensure all BC residents share in the prosperity generated by sustainable economic development. The Memorandum of Understanding between the British Columbia Assembly of First Nations (BCAFN) and the Business Council of British Columbia (BCBC) will bring greater certainty for business to invest and operate and, of utmost importance, opportunity for First Nations to be full participants in the economic future of the province. It is believed to be the first agreement of its kind between a broad business organization and a provincial First Nations organization.

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D'Avignon Op-Ed: Trade deals, infrastructure, national climate framework key for B.C. business (The Hill Times)

Today, some 40 business, First Nations, and community leaders from British Columbia are in Ottawa. Here’s how we can work together with the federal government.

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An Overview of Canada’s Environmental Assessment Regime

As the Liberal government takes up the reins in Ottawa, it has signalled a shift in its approach to energy, environment and natural resource development, particularly in the context of resetting relations with Aboriginal peoples.  As it sets out to review Canada’s EA processes, several key principles should be top of mind:

    • The integrity of the regulatory process and institutions are best maintained when they are at arms-length from the political realm.
    • A core purpose of a regulatory body is to evaluate technical matters in an impartial way, free from undue political or stakeholder influence.
    • Regulatory reviews that set (and adhere to) timelines promote certainty for proponents and contribute to a favourable setting for investors.

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The State of Industry-First Nations Relations in B.C. – Part II: RECOMMENDATIONS

Through our series on the state of industry-First Nation relations in B.C., the Business Council has sought to document and take stock of the economic reconciliation process in the province. The results of this work have highlighted a number of important and mainly positive trends: 1) increased aboriginal business formations; 2) a proliferation of economic agreements between industry, government and First Nations; 3) growing own-source revenues and capacity improvements at the community level; and 4) a generally positive outlook for the future of economic reconciliation. However, the research has also identified some areas of concern that have the potential to constrain the ability of all parties to move further down a reconciliation path that maximizes collective economic opportunities.

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D'Avignon and Ross: 'Green shoots' of First Nations business development (Vancouver Sun)

A critical cornerstone of reconciliation is building economic opportunities for First Nations at the community level. There is a strong, positive correlation between economic empowerment — generating investment, business ownership and jobs — and improving social conditions.

As The Vancouver Sun series First Nations Inc. has shown, we are rapidly moving down this path from a business formation and economic development perspective.

To measure these advancements, the Aboriginal Business Investment Council, with the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training, have funded and developed a database which provides B.C.’s first comprehensive accounting of First Nations business development and economic benefit agreement activities.

The data, which will be publicly available later this fall, highlight the sea change occurring in many First Nations communities as rights and title interests combine with higher educational attainment and economic development agreements to spur increased First Nation business formation, jobs and growth.

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Finlayson & Syer: Building on Success: Assessment of First Nations – Industry Relations in BC (Vancouver Sun)

Increasingly over the past decade industry and First Nations in B.C. have engaged with each other with an overarching objective in mind - to advance resource development by ensuring better outcomes for all parties from economic, environmental and social perspectives. The business case for this kind of industry-First Nations engagement is clear: First Nations have rights and title interests (to a degree unknown) that have to be addressed in order to pursue new development. And while governments (federal, provincial and aboriginal) have crucial responsibilities in the process of reconciliation and in creating certainty for all parties, businesses also have a critical role to play as partners that can provide some of the vital ingredients – investment, expertise and jobs.

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The State of Industry-First Nations Relations in BC – Part I

Over the past thirty years, and accelerating over the last decade or so, industry in British Columbia has increasingly engaged directly with First Nations to build the conditions for investment certainty in resource project development. The business case for doing so is clear – Section 35 aboriginal rights and title have proven challenging to define, and the Crown, for a variety of reasons, has been unable to comprehensively meet all of its consultation and accommodation obligations to First Nations. Nor should government necessarily have to shoulder all of the work related to post-colonial economic engagement with First Nations.

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D'Avignon op-ed: Economic reconciliation with First Nations looks promising (Vancouver Sun)

British Columbia is a diverse and relatively wealthy province. This diversity comes in many forms, including environmental, economic and cultural. Reconciling and harnessing this diversity is what has enabled B.C. to build and sustain a high standard of living and of livability.

However, we are still performing below our collective potential in significant ways.

Within this broad canvas, the province has only recently begun a new relationship between government, First Nations and industry. This relationship has its legal foundations in constitutionally protected aboriginal rights and title and, more directly, in a new era of economic partnerships that both governments and industry have entered into with many of B.C.’s First Nations.

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The Tsilhqot’in Decision – 10 Suggestions for What's Next

There can be little debate that the Tsilhqot’in decision is a landmark case in aboriginal law - creating greater clarity around the nature of aboriginal title under Canada’s Constitution; largely confirming past jurisprudence, and thereby providing important clarity with respect to the Crown’s (limited) ability to ‘justifiably infringe’ on aboriginal title rights; and resolving in the affirmative the application of provincial laws on the land base relative to aboriginal rights and title interests, subject to certain conditions.

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The Tsilhqot'in (William) Decision - a Diversity of Views on Implications

For the past three decades determining the extent and nature of aboriginal rights and title in Canada has been an increasingly important component of natural resource development. British Columbia, with its abundance of natural resources, diversity of First Nations and limited treaties, has been at the forefront of not only important legal decisions (Calder, Sparrow, Gladstone, van der Peet, Delgamuukw, Haida and now Tsilhqot’in) but also a rapidly growing number of collaborative economic initiatives between First Nations, government and industry that are designed to ‘reconcile’ economic activity with aboriginal rights and title interests.

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Business Council of British Columbia statement regarding the Tsilhqot'in Nation v. British Columbia Supreme Court decision (The Roger William's Case)

Greg D’Avignon, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Business Council of British Columbia issues the following statement in response to today’s Supreme Court of Canada decision in the Tsilhqot’in Nation case against the Province of British Columbia

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BC Agenda For Shared Prosperity Final Report

September 25, 2013 (Vancouver, BC) – The Business Council of British Columbia and the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce today released the final report of the BC Agenda for Shared Prosperity initiative. For a year, the two organizations have sought expert and community-based answers to the question: “How can BC become a more prosperous province for all British Columbians?”

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Understanding Economic Development and Reconciliation with First Nations in BC: The Case for Accelerating Economic Engagement

Jurisdictions around the world have engaged in a wide variety of initiatives to reconcile the rights of indigenous peoples within post-colonial government and market economies.

As a province largely without ratified treaties, British Columbia has, by practical and legal necessity, developed a relatively unique set of public and private sector tools to facilitate natural resource development activity on the land base.

In this issue of Policy Perspectives, we highlight the diversity of initiatives underway in British Columbia to advance economic development on the land base. The paper makes the case that there is a promising, albeit challenging, opportunity to move progressively down a path of economic and social reconciliation that will provide tangible benefits to both First Nations and the province as a whole.

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Building Relationships with First Nations
(Published by The Province of British Columbia)

The purposes of this document are to: help companies understand the unique circumstances that frame the legal and business environment in British Columbia; and provide practical assistance and observations for building lasting relationships with First Nations. Relationship between proponents, as well as existing industries, and First Nations can provide solid foundations for effective consultation processes and business partnerships.

This document is divided into two broad sections. The first section provides an overview of the circumstances in the province and the role of proponents and/or existing industries in government’s consultation processes. The second section describes how some companies are building effective relationships with First Nations.

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Boomtown or Ghost Town? The Need to Secure BC's LNG Opportunity

By Greg D'Avignon, President and CEO, Business Council of British Columbia
Even in the best of times, it is extremely rare that a province is presented with an opportunity to develop a new industry with the potential for $50 billion in capital investment over the next five years. Over the longer-term there may be as much as 1.2 million person years of employment, a six-fold increase in annual government royalties and a cumulative total upwards of $1 trillion in additional GDP over the next 30 years. Such are the magnitudes of the economic and social benefits that BC could realize by developing a new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export industry, serving the rapidly expanding Asian markets.

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Lessons Learned from the Prosperity Mine Decision:
Enhancing Project Certainty Through a Social Licence Strategy

Environment and Energy Bulletin       v3 n1
Since the Federal Cabinet’s decision in November, 2010 to prohibit the proposed Prosperity Mine project from proceeding, questions have arisen about how this outcome came to pass, especially in circumstances where the project was previously approved through the British Columbia environmental assessment process and received strong words of support from the BC Government. One only has to consider the voluminous media coverage of this dilemma to understand the answer and to gain an appreciation of what now appears to be the most critical ingredient for success in any major resource project proposal. The critical ingredient? - “social licence” to develop and operate the project.

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