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Environment

One of the greatest challenges facing government and business leaders today is ensuring that our economic development is environmentally sustainable. There is a strong demand for public policies on a host of issues, such as water use, air quality, carbon emissions, environmental assessments, bio-diversity and at-risk species. The Council is committed to providing decision makers with responsible, evidence-based advice on how to promote economic development that meets the needs of environmental stewardship.

Lessons Learned from the Prosperity Mine Decision:
Enhancing Project Certainty Through a Social Licence Strategy

Environment and Energy Bulletin       v3 n1
Since the Federal Cabinet’s decision in November, 2010 to prohibit the proposed Prosperity Mine project from proceeding, questions have arisen about how this outcome came to pass, especially in circumstances where the project was previously approved through the British Columbia environmental assessment process and received strong words of support from the BC Government. One only has to consider the voluminous media coverage of this dilemma to understand the answer and to gain an appreciation of what now appears to be the most critical ingredient for success in any major resource project proposal. The critical ingredient? - “social licence” to develop and operate the project.

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Realizing British Columbia's Second Renewable Electricity Revolution

Authored by OnPoint Consulting Inc.

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Climate Change: BC's Progress Toward a Low-Carbon Economy

Authored by Nancy Olewiler, Simon Fraser University

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Good and Getting Better: Air Quality in the Lower Mainland

Today, urban air quality in Canada is subject to regular monitoring as the human health impacts of exposure to various contaminants are better understood. The sources of air contaminants and the interactions among them clearly affect local air quality, as do factors such as geographic location (coastal versus interior), seasonality and weather conditions, and the extent of trans-boundary pollution. In both Canada and the United States, national and provincial/state regulations exist to manage air quality and set standards for emissions. In British Columbia, Metro Vancouver (formerly the Greater Vancouver Regional District) is in a unique position within Canada because it has delegated authority from the provincial government to regulate air quality in the Lower Mainland. Recently, Metro Vancouver released the long-awaited summary of its 2005 air emissions inventory. This issue of the Business Council’s Environment Bulletin reviews the results of the inventory, examines the projections developed by Metro Vancouver staff, and considers some implications for regional and provincial policy on air quality going forward.

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