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Federal Government

Canada’s federal government is responsible for many policies that matter for BC’s business community, including taxation, immigration, innovation programs and employment insurance. The Council provides regular recommendations to the federal government to ensure that the nation’s top decision makers consider BC’s unique economic priorities.

The Impact of Canadian Environmental Regulatory and Approval Regimes on Business Competitiveness

Environment and Energy Bulletin       v4 n3
The global economic environment remains challenging, as Canadian firms and industries address the need to be competitive and maintain jobs and investment in the country. For Canada, one positive trend is the rise of Asia in the global economy. Today, Asia as a whole accounts for more than 35% of global output, and the figure is expected to approach one-half by 2025. Some analysts believe that sustained growth in China and other emerging economies in Asia (and elsewhere) will fuel a prolonged “up-cycle” for many internationally traded commodities, as rapidly expanding middle class populations in these nations enjoy steadily rising incomes and businesses and governments there invest to build infrastructure, factories, and other fixed assets.

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Submission: Development of a National Conservation Plan

Business Council submission to the Parliament of Canada's Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development regarding the development of a national conservation plan for Canada. It is the Business Council’s view that the policy context, objectives and processes for identifying future conservation and protected areas is firmly entrenched within the current policy and regulatory construct in BC, and is also supported by public values. When existing federal programs are added to the mix, we do not see a need for another federal government framework or plan addressing conservation, especially if it would result in further layers of policy or administration.

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2012 Federal Budget: Some Key Issues for Employers

Human Capital Law and Policy      v2 n2
The 2012 federal budget tabled by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty on March 29 included a number of measures of interest to Canadian employers. In this issue of Human Capital Law and Policy, we note the key features of the budget from an employer perspective and comment briefly on the implications of the policy directions signaled by the government.

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British Columbia Perspectives on a National Energy Strategy (NES)

Environment and Energy Bulletin       v4 n2
There was a time when the words “National Energy Plan” would have caused blood pressure to spike across much of Western Canada, which would then have been followed by colorful descriptions of the federal government. This may no longer be the case - and certainly not if many of the West’s leading think tanks, energy companies and provincial leaders have their way.

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2012 Federal Budget: Fiscal Restraint with New Policy Directions

Business Alert
Reflecting the precarious nature of the economic recovery, Finance Minister Jim Flaherty delivered a budget with few new tax measures, a moderate amount of spending restraint, and a plan to return to fiscal balance over the medium term. From our perspective it is a prudent budget that trims spending sufficiently to balance the books by mid-decade, while not tapping on the fiscal brakes too hard. While the federal workforce will be reduced, overall the level of restraint is such that critics will be hard pressed to claim that it will undermine the economic recovery.

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Presentation: KPMG 2012 Budget Breakfast

Presentation on the current economic landcape and key budget themes presented at the KPMG 2012 Federal Budget Breakfastby Jock Finlayson, Executive Vice President and Chief Policy Officer, Business Council of British Columbia

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EI Rate Consultation - Are Employers Paying True Insurance Premiums?

Human Capital Law and Policy       v1 n3
On August 18, 2011 the Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board (CEIFB) put out a call for consultation as to how the EI rate-setting mechanism could be improved, with submissions due by November 30, 2011. The technical aspects of EI rate-setting may not be top-of-mind for most BC businesses. However, there are aspects of the Employment Insurance program, including rate-setting, that raise significant cost issues for business that should not be ignored.

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Immigration Consultation - Employers Need to Respond

Human Capital Law and Policy       v1 n2
On August 29, 2011, the Federal Government, under Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister Jason Kenney, launched an online public consultation process seeking stakeholder input related to Canada’s immigration program. The consultation process provides an interesting starting point for a discussion of the policy considerations that underlie immigration to Canada and the nature of our current system. It also provides an impetus for employers and business leaders to take an active role in shaping not only immigration policy, but the successful implementation of the policy.

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Temporary Foreign Workers in British Columbia

Policy Perspectives       v18 n3
Canada has a long tradition of attracting immigrants to become permanent residents. Immigration built the country and is the foundation for much of the growth in the post WWII era. The context for international migration, however, is changing and being reshaped. The globalization of labour markets, instant access to information from around the world, greater connectivity and reduced transportation costs, and the expansion of trade have all made international migration a possibility for a larger share of the world’s population than in the past. The result is a significant increase in the volume and types of movement between many jurisdictions. While permanent population movements still dominate migration patterns to advanced countries, there are now greater numbers of temporary movements for work and education-related reasons. While Canadian international migration policy remains focused on permanent settlement, the shifting global landscape, an aging domestic workforce, a large number of major projects in the pipeline, the growing need for highly specialized skills, and regional labour disparities all point to a greater role for temporary workers in B.C. in many sectors.

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Lessons Learned from the Prosperity Mine Decision:
Enhancing Project Certainty Through a Social Licence Strategy

Environment and Energy Bulletin       v3 n1
Since the Federal Cabinet’s decision in November, 2010 to prohibit the proposed Prosperity Mine project from proceeding, questions have arisen about how this outcome came to pass, especially in circumstances where the project was previously approved through the British Columbia environmental assessment process and received strong words of support from the BC Government. One only has to consider the voluminous media coverage of this dilemma to understand the answer and to gain an appreciation of what now appears to be the most critical ingredient for success in any major resource project proposal. The critical ingredient? - “social licence” to develop and operate the project.

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