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Labour & Employment Policy

BC’s changing demographics and shifting employment opportunities present key challenges for employers, such as how to find enough skilled workers, how to adjust to a more diverse and aging workforce and how to comply with workplace regulations. The Council encourages rigorous analysis and proactive policies to address labour issues in advance of marketplace challenges.  The Council also promotes effective relationships between employers and employees by providing information to its members on important labour issues and advising government on policies that affect the workplace.

Finlayson & Peacock Op-Ed: B.C.-Alberta economic links tightest among Canadian provinces (Business in Vancouver)

Canada is a federation made up of provinces and territories with a significant amount of subnational autonomy. The provinces are responsible for delivering health care and education and have jurisdiction over employment standards and occupational regulations governing the labour market. Control of Crown land and regulating the operations of resource industries are also under provincial jurisdiction. Although independent, the provinces co-operate and are integrated and interdependent with each other in an economic sense. The two westernmost provinces, B.C. and Alberta, have especially strong economic connections and exhibit a high degree of economic interdependence.

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Human Capital Policy and Practice in British Columbia:
Growing the Province's Economy & Potential Through Talent

This report, prepared for the Business Council by Kerry Jothen, CEO of Human Capital Strategies, considers BC’s future – what its economic vision should be and what kind of human capital will be needed in the next two decades. It considers how public policy and other factors can support success and prosperity in this arena. This includes a high-level review of current relevant policies and programs – what needs to be changed, enhanced and expanded, and what new actions need to be considered.

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Finlayson & Peacock: High-wage aspirations demand better productivity fundamentals (Business in Vancouver)

A rising statutory minimum wage can be viewed as a policy intervention that seeks to nudge higher the share of total income that accrues to labour rather than to owners of capital, with a particular focus on lower-paid workers. But it comes at a cost.

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Governments Focus on Employment and Labour Law Changes

There has been a renewed interest, on the part of the federal and some provincial governments, in employment standards and labour law reform. In part, this reflects greater public concern over inequality, the growth of "precarious" employment, and the impact of technological innovation on the job market.

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A Snapshot of BC’s Fastest Growing Industries

We look at the 30 BC industries that have grown most rapidly over the past five years, based on average annual growth in economic output (real GDP) between 2011 and 2016.

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Preparing Canada's Workforce for the Next 150: Part One - Government Driven Solutions

In light of Canada’s 150th anniversary celebrations this year, there will be many conversations about innovative, exciting ideas to advance national and regional prosperity. During these discussions, it is important not to lose sight of the less exciting—but vital—work of tending to our policy frameworks so that British Columbians are well prepared to succeed amid shifting economic, technological and labour market realities.

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Another Look at Labour Market Mismatches

There is a cost to the economy when workers are unable to find employment that makes effective use of their particular skills, experience and credentials

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Finlayson & St. Laurent Op-Ed: A Tale of Two Economies: Leveraging Regional Immigration to Enhance Growth (PeopleTalk Spring 2017)

Two factors will largely determine the future trajectory of economic growth in  British Columbia:  productivity performance, and the extent to which the labour force expands over time. The hurdles to achieving long-term economic growth include an aging population, a low natural birth rate, and intense global competition for talent and capital.

Urbanization Feeds Divergence
The outlook for economic growth across B.C. is not uniform. In fact, ongoing urbanization and regional gaps in economic opportunity are feeding into a story of two increasingly diverging economies in the province.

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We're Better Off When We're All Better Off

In honour of International Women’s Day, we’d like to highlight a few points that showcase women’s progress and the need to continue with policies that aim to grow talent.

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BC Jobs Part I: A Visual Summary of BC's 2016 Job Performance Within Canada

In this first of a two part series of blogs on BC Jobs, we provide an overview of employment growth in 2016 within a comparative national framework.

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BC2035

BC2035 is about creating a shared vision of BC’s future and laying down a pathway to realize that vision. It is about initiating conversations, fostering greater collaboration and getting politicians, policy makers, First Nations leaders, and business leaders to think about, prepare for and act on the future.

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Finlayson Op-Ed: Freelance job market booming, but there are real risks (Troy Media & Business in Vancouver)

The rise of the gig or sharing economy is one of the most visible trends shaping the contemporary labour market.

Gig jobs are an example of what economists describe as non­standard work. Such work can be contrasted with a traditional job, in which a person has a durable and structured relationship with a specific employer within a permanent workforce.

Today, more people than ever generate income via contracting, freelancing, temporary assignments and various kinds of on­call arrangements.

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Finlayson Op-Ed: Welcome to the "Gig" Economy (People Talk)

The rise of the “gig” or “sharing” economy is one of the most consequential trends shaping the contemporary labour market.  “Gig” jobs are an example of what economists describe as “contingent” work.  Such work can be contrasted with a traditional job, in which a person has a durable and structured employment relationship with a specific employer that maintains a permanent (or long-term) workforce.  Today, more people than ever before are generating income via contracting, free-lancing, temporary assignments, and various kinds of on-call arrangements.  All of these forms of non-traditional work are part of the “gig economy.”

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Tapping into a "Motherload" of Opportunity

Women, particularly in the child-rearing years of 20-49 years, are less active than their male peers in the workforce. This particular group of sub-optimally engaged women exemplify “missed opportunity."

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Tapping a "Motherload" of Opportunity: How BC Can Gain From More Accessible Childcare

Women, particularly in the child-rearing years, are less active than their male peers in the workforce. The correlation between child-rearing and labour force participation is not coincidental.

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5 Points of Interest about BC’s Labour Market

The BC job market is very healthy and employment is growing at a robust pace. Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey shows that between September and October of this year BC gained another ~15,000 jobs, further underscoring the fact that BC stands out in the federation on most key labour market metrics.

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New Regional Effort Aims to Establish Cascadia Innovation Corridor

British Columbia and Washington leaders come together to strengthen collaboration, create cross-border opportunity

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Innovation for Jobs and Productivity:
Fostering High-Growth BC Businesses, Creating More High-Paying Jobs

How can British Columbia draw on its strengths to build a vibrant, diverse economy, one that produces rewarding employment opportunities and rising incomes for the people who work and do business here? Scholars and leading international organizations agree that the best route to sustained prosperity is by developing a highly productive economy.

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Labour Market Adaptation in the Age of Automation

As disruptive technologies push the frontiers of automation and encroach on some of the advantages that humans have been thought to possess over machines, the way we work is being transformed.

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“I have a master’s degree...but I’m serving sushi.”

Despite hard work and best efforts, the majority of fresh-faced graduates experience a delayed entry into career-oriented jobs, find themselves underemployed—or both. Very rarely are young graduates told what they actually need to be prepared for in the contemporary job market.

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