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British Columbia Since 1995: A Brief Retrospective

As we ponder what British Columbia will look like in 2035 as part of our 50th anniversary programme, it is useful to review how the province’s economy and society have been reshaped over the past two decades, a period of time that has seen the rise of Asia, an expansion of BC’s gateway economy, the development of new and emerging industries, various commodity cycles, changes in the currency, steady inflows of migrants, population aging, and continued urbanization. 

What follows is a brief snapshot of a number of significant, high-level economic and demographic trends that have influenced the province since the mid-1990s.  But first, to provide a bit of context, we highlight a few features of the political setting and the wider external environment from two decades ago. 

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Congested and Nowhere to Go:
Congestion, Road Infrastructure, and Road Pricing in Metro Vancouver

Transportation continues to be a top-of-mind concern for policy makers, business leaders and communities in the lower mainland. How best to manage and use the region's scarce transportation capacity is a complex and often contentious question. In this paper, Jonathan Arnold, who recently completed a co-op term at the Business Council as part of his SFU graduate public policy degree program, explores a number of issues related to transportation demand management, including road pricing, in the Greater Vancouver context.

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A Decade by Decade Review of British Columbia's Economic Performance

By historical accident, the last two new governments to take power in British Columbia did so at the start of new decades: the NDP in 1991, and the Liberals in 2001. Not surprisingly, it’s become popular to argue that one party’s ability to manage the economy was shown to be better than another’s, based on which decade apparently produced the best overall economic outcomes. The Business Council of British Columbia has prepared an analysis of key economic indicators in British Columbia over the 1980’s, 1990’s and 2000’s to provide more data and gain greater insights into longer-term trends. Also, and of particular importance, we examine per-capita measures of economic activity, which take account of changes in population. Lastly, in this report we compare BC’s economic record to that of Canada as a whole. Because world economic conditions tend to affect BC and Canada similarly, determining how BC did relative to the rest of the country can provide a better sense of the extent to which the province capitalized on the global economic conditions of the day.

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Building Relationships with First Nations
(Published by The Province of British Columbia)

The purposes of this document are to: help companies understand the unique circumstances that frame the legal and business environment in British Columbia; and provide practical assistance and observations for building lasting relationships with First Nations. Relationship between proponents, as well as existing industries, and First Nations can provide solid foundations for effective consultation processes and business partnerships.

This document is divided into two broad sections. The first section provides an overview of the circumstances in the province and the role of proponents and/or existing industries in government’s consultation processes. The second section describes how some companies are building effective relationships with First Nations.

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2011-2012 Holiday Business Hours Survey

The Business Council of British Columbia conducts an annual survey to deterine when members will be open during the holiday season. Thank you to all that participated in the survey.

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2010 Biennial Skills and Attributes

The labour demands of the marketplace are continually changing with the general economic environment and the introduction of new technologies. Reflecting these pressures, British Columbia employers are seeking different combinations of skills and attributes in new hires in order to maintain their competitive edge. Job seekers in turn must keep pace with the necessary skills set sought by employers in today's dynamic work environment. The Business Council of BC's 2010 Biennial Survey has been designed to help entrants to the workforce do just that: identify the most important skills and attributes BC employers are seeking in new job applicants. Identifying these skills and attributes in turn helps job seekers better prepare for careers in a range of sectors and occupations.

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