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Skills Training & Education

Human capital is one of the most comprehensive files on the Council’s agenda. Primary education, industry training, the university system, immigrant integration and other human-capital issues are all crucial to BC’s economic development. As BC’s economy becomes increasingly dominated by skill-demanding industries, governments and businesses have a growing responsibility to help enhance the talents of British Columbians.

2013 Federal Budget: A Combination of Following Through, Fiscal Restraint and Some New Funding for Priority Areas

Against a backdrop of softer economic conditions, Finance Minister Jim Flaherty tabled a budget still centered around achieving the Conservative government’s 2015-16 balanced budget target. To meet that objective, the Budget imposes meaningful but not draconian spending restraint. In turn, this left little capacity for much in the way of new spending or tax relief. The Budget does, however, direct additional funding to a few priority areas such as skills training and infrastructure investment.

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Finlayson: Canada's job machine is robust (Vancouver Sun)

Canada’s jobs machine is chugging along nicely even as the nation’s economy appears to be losing a step. Statistics Canada’s latest labour force survey reports that 51,000 jobs were created in February, far more than economic forecasters were anticipating.

On a six-month moving average basis, employment gains have been averaging 30,000 per month. The unemployment rate remained steady at seven per cent in February, as the number of labour force entrants offset the new positions created.

Drilling down into the data, private sector employment rose by 30,000 last month; since September 2012, Canadian businesses have been expanding their payrolls by 20,000 a month. By industry, job gains were concentrated in service-producing sectors, with professional, scientific and technical services and accommodation and foodservices emerging as notable hot spots. Manufacturing employment sagged and continues to trail the economy-wide job growth rate.

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Post-Secondary Education A Key Determinant of Economic Success

Human Capital Law and Policy       v2 n4
Reports from the BC Progress Board and the recent Commission on Reform of Ontario’s Public Services underscore some important facts about globalization and the acceleration of the knowledge economy: people are our most important economic asset – more important than resources, more important than financial capital.

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Business Council of BC Launches New Platform for “Next” Generation of Leaders

September 14, 2012 (Vancouver, BC) – The Business Council of BC and TELUS President and CEO Darren Entwistle today launched a unique new engagement platform called “Next” that is bringing today’s young leaders together and ensuring their perspectives are brought forward to shape the future policy and economic development conversations taking place in British Columbia. “As Generation X and Y begin to assume key leadership roles in companies and communities across BC and Western Canada, there are shifts occurring that require an active dialogue between the baby boomers still leading businesses and these Next leaders,” said Greg D’Avignon, President and CEO of the Business Council. “Working with our member companies and our sponsoring corporate partners TELUS, Stantec and RBC, we have created a movement of young business people and a place for them to share fresh ideas, build knowledge and provide the mentoring and networking that supports collaboration.”

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Industrial Relations Bulletin

This publication is available to members only.
For more information please contact info@bcbc.com.

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Boomtown or Ghost Town? The Need to Secure BC's LNG Opportunity

By Greg D'Avignon, President and CEO, Business Council of British Columbia
Even in the best of times, it is extremely rare that a province is presented with an opportunity to develop a new industry with the potential for $50 billion in capital investment over the next five years. Over the longer-term there may be as much as 1.2 million person years of employment, a six-fold increase in annual government royalties and a cumulative total upwards of $1 trillion in additional GDP over the next 30 years. Such are the magnitudes of the economic and social benefits that BC could realize by developing a new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export industry, serving the rapidly expanding Asian markets.

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Submission: Provincial Government's Expert Panel on Business Taxation

In response to the provincial government's request for input, the Business Council of British Columbia is pleased to share our views with the Expert Panel on tax measures that could be implemented to strengthen BC’s economy and competitive position as the province shifts from the HST back to the dual PST/GST system. The Panel is familiar with the benefits of the HST, and the many reasons why economists and public finance scholars almost universally see value-added taxes like the HST as an important and useful element in the revenue mix for governments.

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Public Sector pensions are sure to be reviewed

By Jock Finlayson, Executive Vice President and Chief Policy Officer, Business Council of British Columbia
With governments across the country addressing budget deficits pushed higher by the 2008-09 recession, attention is turning to the pay levels of employees in the public sec-tor and how these compare with private-sector practices.

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Presentation: BC's Economic Outlook

Presented to Economic Development Association of British Columbia by Ken Peacock, Chief Economist, Business Council of British Columbia

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Temporary Foreign Workers in British Columbia

Policy Perspectives       v18 n3
Canada has a long tradition of attracting immigrants to become permanent residents. Immigration built the country and is the foundation for much of the growth in the post WWII era. The context for international migration, however, is changing and being reshaped. The globalization of labour markets, instant access to information from around the world, greater connectivity and reduced transportation costs, and the expansion of trade have all made international migration a possibility for a larger share of the world’s population than in the past. The result is a significant increase in the volume and types of movement between many jurisdictions. While permanent population movements still dominate migration patterns to advanced countries, there are now greater numbers of temporary movements for work and education-related reasons. While Canadian international migration policy remains focused on permanent settlement, the shifting global landscape, an aging domestic workforce, a large number of major projects in the pipeline, the growing need for highly specialized skills, and regional labour disparities all point to a greater role for temporary workers in B.C. in many sectors.

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2010 Biennial Skills and Attributes

The labour demands of the marketplace are continually changing with the general economic environment and the introduction of new technologies. Reflecting these pressures, British Columbia employers are seeking different combinations of skills and attributes in new hires in order to maintain their competitive edge. Job seekers in turn must keep pace with the necessary skills set sought by employers in today's dynamic work environment. The Business Council of BC's 2010 Biennial Survey has been designed to help entrants to the workforce do just that: identify the most important skills and attributes BC employers are seeking in new job applicants. Identifying these skills and attributes in turn helps job seekers better prepare for careers in a range of sectors and occupations.

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Where will the Workers Come From? British Columbia Labour Force Projections to 2030

Authored by Ken Peacock and Jock Finlayson, Business Council of British Columbia

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Achieving a Highly Skilled, High-Performace Workforce in British Columbia

Authored by Kerry Jothen, Chief Executive Officer, Human Capital Strategies

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15 by 15: A Comprehensive Policy Framework for Early Human Capital Investment in BC

Authored by Paul Kershaw, Ph.D., Lynell Anderson, CGA, Bill Warburton, Ph.D., Clyde Hertzman, M.D., M.Sc., FRCPC, FRSC
Human Early Learning Partnership
University of British Columbia

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Universities and the Knowledge Economy

Authored by David H. Turpin, President and Vice Chancellor, Eric Sager, Professor of History, Lyn Tait and Ludgard De Decker
University of Victoria

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Changing People Changing Places: Demographic and Economic Change in British Columbia

Authored by David Baxter, Andrew Ramlo and Erin Ramlo, Urban Futures

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BC's Advanced Technology Sector: Reaching for the Next Level

Authored by the BC Technology Industry Association

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